IPS Week 2017: Meet Mike Allebach

IPS Week 2017: Meet Mike Allebach

Hi! Tell us a little bit about yourself. What was your road like to becoming a photographer?

I spent the last 15 years as either a graphic artist, communications director or marketing director until transitioning to full time photographer four years ago. I started the photography business while I was a graphic artist. It's been my baby for 10 years. At the very beginning I decided to make it a business based for people who were more offbeat or punk rock.

Have you always done IPS sessions? When did you realize this was something you wanted (or needed!) to incorporate into your photography business?

For so long in my business I tried to figure out the IPS thing, even just upgrading wedding album covers and adding a few pages to the album. I didn't know how to accomplish this. When I met with clients I knew I wasn't doing something right, but I didn't exactly know what it was. It turned out to be many things. I didn't know my cost of doing business and my product costs very well. That was when I decided to really buckle down and figure IPS out, in order to change my business and work for the better.

How important are these IPS sessions to your success as a photographer?

IPS has doubled my business in less than 12 months from getting trained on an IPS system. It's really helped cash flow and allowed me to run the business of my dreams. My five year goal is to gross over one million a year in portrait photography alone.

What tools do you use to ensure your IPS session with your client flows smoothly?

Each of my albums are designed in Fundy and my wall art is designed in ProSelect. When I’m doing IPS, I show clients their photos via projector on a blank white wall with ProSelect. It really helps them visualize the prints in their homes and seals the deal. Without Fundy or Proselect I could not be as successful as I am today.

What does a typical IPS session look like? What steps do you take to get your clients interested in those keepsake products?

You have to seed the IPS experience from the beginning. Unless it's a simple corporate headshot, I'm not interested in photographing for digital. They know right off the bat that I want to create artwork for their home. If I can't convince them of the value I can provide, they won't book me. I have found that in the beginning of IPS only asking for a small fee to book the date keeps things moving. They understand the initial fee is for my time and to make sure they will show up. They know they are paying for my expertise and wall art.  

If someone was thinking about starting IPS, what advice would you give them?

Pay for training from someone who has done this successfully. Whatever you do, don't join the free online facebook groups on IPS. You will quickly get overwhelmed by opinions of people who are on the same level as you. You can save years of hassle and trouble by signing up for a paid IPS course.

 

If you want a beautiful, colorful, comfortable photography experience you've landed at the right place. Finding a photographer who makes you feel comfortable and delivers beautiful photos is hard!  That's why we specialize in making your photography experience a comfortable one. It's what we do best! See more of our work on our website, Instagram, and Facebook.




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