Design Aglow DIY: Photo Box Inspiration for Photographers

Design Aglow DIY: Photo Box Inspiration for Photographers

Glass photo boxes are a huge trend right now, and we're totally hopping on the train! Chances are, you're handing this over with a few of the most stand out prints as well as a matching USB drive with the rest of the photos. But how do you deliver this luxe-looking packaging without having the drive bouncing around inside the box? Well, we're getting a little crafty today, and showing you how to add the finishing touches to a glass box gift for clients. 

Grab your coffee (of course) and supplies and let's get started on this quick, 10 minute project!

Step 1: Gather your supplies

  • pen or pencil
  • ribbon (about 24 inches... You don't want your bow to turn out wonky!)
  • glass photo box
  • glass USB drive (we have wooden options as well!)
  • photo release card (free download with glass photo box purchase)
  • scissors or X-Acto knife
  • 4x6 prints (our example prints are curtsey of Julie Paisley)

Step 2: Center your ribbon down the length of your photo release card. If you choose to use a thicker ribbon (like our double-faced satin ribbon, picture above), fold it in half lengthwise.

Step 3: Hold your glass USB Drive down in the center of the card, on top of the ribbon, and make four like marks on the sides of the ribbon where they meet the drive. These marks will measure the width of your ribbon and guide you when cutting into the card.

4x6 Glass Photo Box DIY for Photographers

Step 4: Remove the ribbon and draw two horizontal lines between the marks you've just made, using a straight edge as a guide. We're using the side of our USB drive to draw a line, but we recommend a ruler for the straightest edge. Then, using an X-Acto Knife or scissors, carefully cut along your lines. Be sure to have a very sharp cutting tool in order to create a seamless opening.

4x6 Glass Photo Box DIY for Photographers

Step 5: Feed the ribbon through the two slits you've made. Be sure to fold your ribbon in half if using a thicker style.

4x6 Glass Photo Box DIY for Photographers

Step 6: Tie a knot or bow, depending on your style.

4x6 Glass Photo Box DIY for Photographers

Step 7: Place your photo release card and USB drive on top of your selected 4x6 prints inside the glass box. And voila! Your glass photo box is ready to be delivered to your clients~

4x6 Glass Photo Box DIY for Photographers




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