Design Aglow Cinema: Meet Fairytale Studio

It’s bittersweet, but like all good things our Cinema Line Launch has to come to an end. To conclude our roundup of the most inspirational filmmakers in the industry, we’re thrilled to have David Ruzicka of Fairytale Studio with us.

Hi David, your work is extremely polished, with a real cinematic feel. Can you tell us about your approach?

I always want to create an absolutely unique film for each couple. In order to have the time to create something amazing and personal, I only take on 10 to 15 weddings per year. I believe no one should get an unoriginal wedding video but highly polished personalized wedding film. I want my couples to be proud of their film.

Your work commands high prices. Many pros say they can never get prices like that because they are in a more working-class market. Can you speak about what differentiates a $12k video artist from the average $1k pro?

The client investment with Fairytale Studio is not only reflected in the final product (wedding film), but also in the customer service and client relationship. This starts with the pre-wedding interaction/preparation, impeccable service, and our accessibility post-event, during the editing process. It's those little things, like a high level of professionalism and extra services that are a big part of my draw for my clients. The price also corresponds with our studio’s low volume and custom experience from beginning to end.

Tell us a bit about your typical workflow. Anything different than the norm?

I begin by gathering information about the event months in advance, so I am well prepared to shoot when the wedding begins. My team always has a complete plan for each wedding, which allows us to delegate tasks, stay on top of timing, and ensure we get all of the footage we need. Afterwards, during the editing, I listen carefully to my clients’ ideas. This allows me to create and deliver a personalized wedding video specifically for them. Finally, and most importantly, I make sure I always deliver their final product on time.

Where do you see wedding (and portrait) cinematography going in the next 5 years?

Wedding cinematography has really progressed in the last few years, and I feel that it is finally on the same level as photography. Before this shift occurred, we were often overlooked as a service that wasn’t as necessary as photography.

Cinematographers know capturing video is much much more work than a photographer needs to ever worry about. Just getting great sound alone is an art form in itself. I shoot my weddings in a Raw format, just like photographers. However I record 24 Raw images every second, while a photographer does about one picture a minute on average. In that time I already recorded 1440 Raw images. I mean that's crazy. I can even create a photo album just picking frames out of my video footage.

Going forward, I see wedding cinematography being valued at a higher rate than it is now; possibly even surpassing photographer’s rates. I also see photographers merging their businesses to also incorporate video, although I think each will always has it place and never disappear.


David Ruzicka is an acclaimed European born cinematographer. His company, Fairytale Studio, established in 2008, when by series of coincidences collided and he created his first wedding film and immediately fell in love with cinematography. He’s a member of Style me Pretty's Little Black Book, and his weddings have been featured on numerous blogs such as Grey Likes Wedding, Grace Ormonde, Brooklyn Bride, Tulle and Twine and Beautiful South Asian Brides.



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