Keeping Your Creative Work Safe With Copyright

Keeping Your Creative Work Safe With Copyright

Imagine this scenario: You capture a wedding image of a beaming bride and groom, backlit in a glowing field. The couple is (of course) thrilled; once they receive a USB of images (after carefully educating them about your copyright), the couple proceeds to post them all over the internet, as many happy couples do. The images appear on their personal and business Facebook pages, Twitter, Flickr, message boards, and the bride’s personal blog. And then one day, in an internet place far removed from its original source, you stumble upon your gorgeous (and still copyrighted) image being used to sell a product or service online. The image source isn’t credited--of course, because internet thieves don’t credit image sources--and your stomach sours when you realize that the copyright infringer is making money from your picture. Making money from your sweat and talent and expertise. This is theft of your intellectual property--and unless you’ve protected your images’ copyright, it’s hard to do much about it. To be completely and honestly doomsday about it, this scenario happens every day. Instead of promoting their goods and services by commissioning images exclusively or sourcing them from stock photography agencies, unscrupulous internet dwellers are just stealing them from other websites.

Don’t be this photographer; protect your rights against internet image shoplifting by registering your photography with the US Copyright Office (or your own country’s copyright agency). The process is relatively simple; we recommend registering your work every 3 months, and incorporating the steps for registry into your image workflow. Once you copyright your images, you become eligible for statutory and actual damages, should your images’ copyright be infringed. For how to’s, helpful hints, and best practices on the process of copyright, our newly redesigned Copyright and Authentication Bundle will ensure that your livelihood is fully protected. And the Bundle’s printable Certificate of Authenticity and Copyright sticker opens up a dialogue between you and your clients, on what copyright means for them and how they can help you preserve your copyright online.

Above all, remember that the keys to your copyright kingdom are in your hands. You can’t control if your images are stolen online, but you can control the ramifications when they are.

Special thanks to Elizabeth Messina for the beautiful image.




Also in Design Aglow Blog

Design Aglow Summit: Twyla Jones
Design Aglow Summit: Twyla Jones

0 Comments

Instead of spending countless hours looking outward to others for inspiration, this course will show you how to be motivated by the real moments occurring right before your eyes. Find your creative voice by being present in your daily life, whether those moments be personal or professional.

Read More

Design Aglow Summit: Jacob Loafman
Design Aglow Summit: Jacob Loafman

0 Comments

As an artist, creating personal work is vital. With no deadlines, rules, timelines... there is only your creative medium and your mind. Jacob will demonstrate how act of creating personal work is where new ideas and directions are born, shaping future client work or even more personal work. He will inspire you to explore your imagination to open up new creative directions we didn’t even realize we had within us. Exploring personal work is allowing our minds be free and encouraging our imagination to be turned all the way up. Jacob will inspire you to turn it on and turn it up.

Read More

Travel With Photographers: Tyler Cave
Travel With Photographers: Tyler Cave

0 Comments

I recently travelled to Banff, Alberta on a spontaneous trip with another filmmaker, Mike, and we spent one week exploring around the national park. The trip was planned a week before we left. My friend flew from LA and met me in Vancouver and we began our 10 hour road trip.I recently travelled to Banff, Alberta on a spontaneous trip with another filmmaker, Mike, and we spent one week exploring around the national park. The trip was planned a week before we left. My friend flew from LA and met me in Vancouver and we began our 10 hour road trip.

Read More