how to set up a packaging station for under $250

how to set up a packaging station for under $250

Your tape’s in one drawer, while your scissors are in another. Those cute tags you just ordered? Sitting in a box by the front door. And your boxes and bags are stored all the way in the garage.

No wonder it takes you 30 minutes to wrap a simple order. What you need is a place for everything, and everything in its place. Now that you’ve refreshed your packaging line with products from Design Aglow’s Paper Shop, do yourself a favor and get your supplies organized with a dedicated packaging station. With a trip to IKEA and some imagination, we created ours in an afternoon for less than $250, and we’ll illustrate how you can too.

You’ll need a unit for storage, and a flat surface for assembly. We used IKEA’s EXPEDIT shelves in high gloss white and MELLTORP table, but an old dresser and large kitchen island or desk would work well too.  The more space the better, but with smart storage solutions, you can make a smaller area just as functional.

Organize by size. Our EXPEDIT groups boxes & bags into small, medium, and large. Its open cubbies make the packaging easy to see, and therefore easy to grab; another storage option is to pack materials flat in labeled drawers.

Collect and sort. Put your tape, scissors, tags, pens/markers, stamps, and any other small items in a tray, box, or caddy, preferably with dividers for each item so they can be easily accessed. Think about how you could repurpose an storage object already around your house to save $.

Think vertical. Hanging--on shelves, hooks, or wire--is a great way to keep items in reach. A drying rack suspended on the wall or brackets like these from IKEA could house tissue, twine, or spools of ribbon. And of course, the Paper Shop’s kraft paper roll and dispenser can be wall mounted to save extra space (we have it pictured on the desk right now).

Don’t forget the paper goods! Putting together a Welcome Packet? You’ll need all the pieces handy. Same goes for thank you notes, and business/referral cards. You can store these in a file folder or drawer; just make sure they’re near your packaging station.

Keep track of your supplies so you can stock up. Opening up a dry pad of ink will surely slow you down, as will an emergency trip to the post office for more stamps. Plan ahead so that you’re always replenished. Need another visual? Pin our handy graphic so that you’ll know exactly what you need to set up your own packaging station. And if you have a station that you’d like to share, please post to our Facebook page! Just like you, we’re always seeking inspiration.

Wondering about a specific item in the image above? You can find them here:
1. Bags
2. Boxes
3. EXPEDIT shelves
4. Welcome folders
5. Welcome Packets
6. Paper roll
7. MELLTORP table
8. Ribbon
9. Chair




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