product spotlight - selling a showpiece portrait: client guide

Selling large statement pieces to your clients is an essential part of your success! This guide is designed to help you succeed in three primary ways:

1. By eliminating your clients' "big 8x10" mentality. While you understand an 8x10 or 11x14 isn't an impressive piece of wall art, clients might not. Replace their stale ideas of what portrait art should be by putting our best display practices to work for you.

2. By teaching you how to most effectively showcase your art. Clients' perspective is their reality so it's critical to provide them with a guiding purchasing process that is both elegant and educational.

3. By providing a visual expert guide that is simple to use and simple to sell with!

When clients can visualize the impact of appropriately-sized artwork, selling portraits is a breeze! We demonstrate portrait sizes ranging from the smaller 16x20 (looks so silly over the sofa!) to properly sized 30x40 (the goal!) and a few stops in between. This creates instant value not in only your work, but for your expert advice. Clients leave the buying process feeling like smart consumers, and you leave it with the largest possible sale in hand.


• Sizing visuals show clients the literal difference in how their images will look on a wall (16x20, 20x24, 24x30 and 30x40)
• High quality timeless furniture, photographed by Design Aglow
• Fully layered PSD files for complete customization (easily add your own portraits to the image placeholders)
• Print as a quad-fold piece or use a digital PDF on your website, tablet, or as a PDF email

Some of the latest stock roomshots are, shall we say...shabby and not so chic. Distinguish your studio with our high-quality furniture selections and leave the cheesy typical stock shots for the amateurs!

Click here to see it in the shop!




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