product spotlight: studio email assistant

Struggling for the right words when writing to everyone, from future brides to disgruntled clients, vivacious vendors and hopeful assistants? Design Aglow has partnered with professional photographer and wordsmith extraordinaire Heather Rivlin to create this extensive collection of 20 professionally crafted letters to deliver the perfect prose for any situation while establishing your studio's solid business policies. Whether you draw from this complete catalog of correspondence for emails, phone scripts or mailed content, you're sure to appreciate these time savers while your clients and contacts appreciate your customer service and attention. 1. Email response to price shoppers.This welcome email aids you with responding to price shoppers/hagglers and provides a strong education in the value of wedding/portrait photography. 2. Style and Session. This email explains the photographer's shooting style, the session, the ordering process and payment. 3. Pre-session email. This email sets the rules for the shoot and reminds customers via key bullet points what's included in the session fee. 4. Second Photo Shoot Rescheduling. This email sets forth studio policy regarding rescheduling for a second time. 5. Second Order Appointment Rescheduling. This email sets forth studio policy when rescheduling for a second time. 6. Photographer as client. This email shares how to approach a local photographer who wants a shoot with you. 7. Addressing post session digital files and sticker shock. This email shares how to handle a miscommunication regarding digital file inclusion, or when a client experiences cost concerns after the session. 8. Economic concerns post session. This email covers how to address reticence in ordering after a session when a client asks to postpone ordering. 9. Unauthorized internet use of an image. This email addresses how to approach a client who has scanned/copied your images to or from the internet without permission. 10. Mentor request. This email shares how to address a request from a local photographer wishes to be mentored by you or wants to assist you 11. Client order session preparation. This email prepares clients for the upcoming order session. 12. Client session clothing choices. This email outlines practical suggestions regarding clothing choices for the upcoming photography session. 13. Difficult client returns. This email shares how to respectfully handle a difficult former client who wishes to hire you again. 14. Vendor barter request. This email addresses a vendor who has requested a free shoot in return for future referrals/word-of-mouth in lieu of payment. 15. Money past due. This registered letter shares correspondence for money owed on a session or order when the client is unresponsive. 16. Creating potential bride interest. This email illustrates how to respond to potential brides in order to compel them to continue the conversation. 17. Pleasing anxious clients. This email outlines how to reassure excited clients whose continued queries regarding the status of their order are drawing your attention away from processing orders and handling other business in your studio. 18. Session Follow-up Email. This email shares gratitude to a client for a wonderful session and shares an incentive program for referrals. 19. Client Questionnaire. This email shares a sample questionnaire to send to clients to get to know them and their needs before the session begins. 20.  Client Reshoot Request. This email shows what to say when a client requests a reshoot for reasons that are not due to studio negligence (clothing choice, hair not brushed, child not cooperating, etc.). Click here to check it out in the shop!


Also in Design Aglow Blog

Wedding Week 2017: Meet Mark Martucci
Wedding Week 2017: Meet Mark Martucci

0 Comments

I’ve been taking photographs ever since I can remember, but once I entered the world of wedding photography I felt the need to really understand my gear. Once you really learn your tools, you can worry less about the technical side and focus on putting your vision into that single frame. I feel the faster I can work, and the more intuitively I know my equipment, the more creative I can be. Wedding photography can make you a pro really fast. I think that artistic pressure is what drove me towards it.

Read More

Wedding Week 2017: Meet Cassandra Zetta
Wedding Week 2017: Meet Cassandra Zetta

0 Comments

As a lifelong fine artist, I didn’t fall in love with photography until post-college. I was a graphic design major who landed a non-creative position in the industry. Upon searching for a creative outlet, and being the hopeless romantic that I am, I discovered wedding photography and was immediately hooked. I poured everything I had into learning the medium so that I could eventually start my own business, which happened a couple of years later in 2012 — also the year I was married.

Read More

Wedding Week 2017: Meet Julia Green
Wedding Week 2017: Meet Julia Green

0 Comments

I am a wedding and portrait photographer based in Portland, but catering to clients across the Pacific Northwest and beyond. As a child, I never imagined that I would pursue photography. I didn’t even own a DSLR until I was 21! However, I remember the day I decided I wanted to learn the ins and outs of photography. I used my college textbook money to buy my first Canon Rebel from Craigslist. I was jumping up and down with joy and scratching my head at the same time because I knew photography would not be simply a hobby.

Read More